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Dullcote

 
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OGOPTIMUS
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Joined: 10 Nov 2006
Posts: 981

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 2:17 am    Post subject: Dullcote Reply with quote

So, what does dullcote really do? For what I know it's just a clear sealant that you can spray on something to prevent wear and tear.

Now, it did something strange to a miniature of mine. After basecoating it, I made some marks on it with a sharpie, and then painted those details right over the marks, but when I sprayed on the dullcote, the sharpie seemed to rise right through the paint! Thus, my wonderful paintjob was ruined! Not to mention the decals on the ship!

Anyone else seen something like this?
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Scoutdad
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Joined: 09 Oct 2006
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Location: Middle Tennessee

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 2:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I've seen something similar. I used a ultra-fine marker to "paint" some tiger strips on a Lyran mini once. Everything was fine until the clearcoat stage. Apparently, the solvents in the clearcoat re-activated the alcohol (or whatever it is...) base the marker ink used and the strips ran. I had to strip and repaint th miniature. I've known of that happening ot a couple of other people also. That's why I hardly ever use ink any more.

And when I do use ink, I spray a really thin coat of sealer on the mini and allow that to dry. I can then use a heavier coat (for protection) that will not cause the ink to run.

As for what "dullcoat" does: It provides a protective coating that helps prevent chipping and cracking of the paint during normal use. For an example of how it hows, take an old miniature, slap some color on it (you don't have to be precise), and then clink it against another miniature (or tap it with a metal tool a couple of times). Rather quickly the paint will scratch, chip, and wear off. Then, run you finger back and forth across one of the corners. You will quickly wear through the paint and expose the metal underneath. I couple of thin coats of clear sealant (I know some people use gloss, some semi-gloss, and some use dull or matte) will help prevent these dings from happening.
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djdood
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Joined: 01 Feb 2007
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Location: Seattle, WA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 4:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Actually dullcoat's primary reason to be is to break up the light hitting the mini's surface. This cuts the reflections and shine and helps it look more scale-accurate (and less plastic).

The sealing things it does could just as easily be done by other things (gloss coat, etc), but then the minis would look even more toy-like.
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jmt
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Joined: 08 Oct 2006
Posts: 395
Location: Plano, TX

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 1:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In general, the gloss finish is the hardest wearing (i.e. protects the most). Testors Dull coat, while diffusing the light, wears away quickly.

For "demonstration miniatures", I usually cover them with a coat of Glossy first THEN hit them with a second coat of matt (or dull coat). Gives both protection and reduces shine.

Be careful with some clear polyurethanes, though. If you have a significant difference in temperature and humidity from where you store the figure before coating it (i.e. your work room) and then where you coat it (the backyard), you can get either a cloudy finish or beads.

I usually take my can and miniature outside and leave them for at least 30 minutes before sealing them. The same goes for priming.

jmt
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Scoutdad
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Once again, Will is more correct than I am. You were asking specifically about dullcoat and I informed you about clear sealers in general.

As previously stated, any type of clear sealer will protect the miniature in question (gloss better than the others)... the dullcoat cuts the reflections and shine to provide a less toy-like sheen.
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djdood
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 7:43 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Some people dunk their minis in un-diluted Future floor polish to seal them, and then spray them with dullcoat to cut the shine.
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Scoutdad
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 8:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hmmm... I've never heard of that one, but I may try it...
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Crimin
Lieutenant JG


Joined: 12 Apr 2007
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Location: New Orleans, LA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 9:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

When I first started doing minis, one of the "tricks" I was told was to mix a small amount of black paint in some Mop'n'Glo, and to paint that onto the figure. That way you got shading and sealer all in one step - better hope it comes out the way you want it though!

Given the beginner level of painting skill I had at the time (and still posses, to be honest), I was pretty happy with the results.

Nowadays I use a matte finish spray coat, but those old figures I used the Mop'n'Glo on are still well sealed and shiny.
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djdood
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ahhh, yes. "Magic Wash" is the term I learned that trick under (which uses Future; but Future and Mop'n'Glo are pretty much the same stuff).

It is indeed a good technique. It works really well for getting shading and shadows. The clear acrylic from the floor polish helps break up the surface tension and suck the paint into crevices and corners.
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Crimin
Lieutenant JG


Joined: 12 Apr 2007
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Location: New Orleans, LA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 21, 2008 10:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

"Magic Wash" - yep, that's the name. Haven't heard that one in a while!

I got away from doing that in the mid '90s, when I got into WWII wargaming. "Bright and shiny" looked much better on a fantasy army than on soldiers.
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